Welcome to theTransylvanian Wildlife Project!




Wildlife Conservation in TransylvaniaThe Transylvanian Wildlife Project are a team of dedicated conservationists determined to preserve one of the last true wilderness areas of Europe. We are building an informative database, methodically documenting the flora and fauna within the region. The aim of our independent research is to act as an environmental health barometer. Continue....


The lynx is one of the most widespread medium sized cats of which there are four recorded species, the Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx), Iberian lynx (Lynx pardinus), Canadian lynx (Lynx canadensis) and the Bobcat (Lynx rufus). Due to the vast geographical distribution of the Eurasian lynx it shows a huge phenotypic variation resulting in 11 subspecies, but the precise classification of these subspecies is very much subject to debate and relates to the region in which they are found and the small morphological differences each possess. The species found in the Carpathians is considered as a one of these subspecies, Lynx lynx carpathicus. The Eurasian lynx inhabits mountainous and forested regions Continue....


Brown BearBrown bears have a large global distribution which reflects their ability to adapt to a variety of habitats. There are estimated to be more than 200,000 brown bears worldwide, with approximately 6000 individuals in the Carpathian region of Romania. They are amongst the largest living carnivores, with males weighing up to 350kg, and females to 200kg, Continue....



running wolfThe grey wolf, Canis lupus, is the most widespread of carnivores and the most misunderstood. Historically, the wolf occupied all habitats in the Northern Hemisphere that contained large ungulates, ranging from 20°N latitude to the polar ice pack, inhabiting dense forest to open grasslands, Arctic tundra to extreme deserts. Continue....


The golden eagle, Aquila chrysaetos, is possibly the best known bird of prey in the Northern hemisphere, occurring throughout North America, Eurasia and Africa, with five sub-species recorded. Historically the golden eagle was widespread throughout the Holarctic but has since disappeared from heavily populated areas and still remains rare in many Eastern European countries with some populations still in decline: in Romania they are currently considered as vulnerable but are afforded strict protection. Golden eagles are territorial, holding territories up to 150km2 and although their habitat requirements are not specific, they are dependant on undisturbed nesting sites. Continue....


European Polecat head onThe mustelid family consists of badgers, otters, mink, weasels, polecats and martens, all of which possess the key feature of anal glands that produce a thick, oily, powerful-smelling discharge called musk which is used to mark their territories and from which they get their name. Species within this family are tough, voracious and often opportunistic predators capable of taking on prey much larger than themselves in some cases, but despite this they remain one of the least studied mammal groups in Europe. Members of this family share a number of other characteristics which include the male being slightly larger than the female and in all but the martens, non-retractable claws. Continue....